HAVASUPAI Reservations 2022 (Havasupai Official Info)

HAVASUPAI

Visiting Havasupai Falls Update

Dear xxx

We are reaching out to you because you have previously visited Havasupai Falls, expressed a desire to visit Havasupai Falls, or you possibly know someone with a current Havasupai Falls Reservation.

Know that Havasupai tourism is temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic. While plans to reopen are being discussed, no dates have been set yet.

The Havasupai Reservation and Supai Village remain on lockdown and are closed to all tourists. Please do not travel to the Havasupai Reservation or Supai Village. All tourists are prohibited from entering at this time. Please check for updates at HavasupaiReservations.com and HavasupaiLodge.com.


What are your Reservation date preferences?

You can now enter Reservation Preferences. Entering your preferences can give you the best chance of obtaining the exact reservation you want, so you can make the most of your trip to Havasupai Falls.

This information is also needed for next season’s visitor tourism planning purposes. You can enter as many preferred dates as you would like.

Your Campground Reservation Preference >>

Your Lodge Reservation Preference >>

Reminder: Reservations remain non-refundable and non-changeable, and travel insurance is always recommended, especially for visiting Havasupai Falls.

Any reservations affected by the temporary suspension of tourism now or in the future will be rescheduled to a later date at no cost.


You can book a Reservation via the Transfer System right now

All Reservations had to be rescheduled to the 2022 season. New Reservations will not be available for purchase until 2023 or later. The Transfer System is the only way to obtain a Reservation.

You can obtain an existing Reservation right now, which can be used after tourism reopens.

The Transfer System is the only way for current reservation holders to have funds returned to them.

Existing Reservations are available for purchase on the public Cancellations / Transfers list and all Reservations purchased now are active and valid for use once tourism reopens.

Check the Campground reservations Cancellations / Transfer list here >>

Check the Lodge reservations Cancellations / Transfer list here >>

You can also purchase a Reservation if you are listed as a PATL (Potential Alternate Trip Leader) on a Reservation.

Pack Mule reservations can be booked after a Campground or Lodge reservation has been booked.

Associated Pack Mule reservations, if affected by the tourism closure, will be automatically rescheduled along with the affected Campground or Lodge reservation.


Check the Reservations websites frequently for updates

Updates will be posted in your account dashboard as soon as they become available.

HavasupaiReservations.com

HavasupaiLodge.com


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Snow Photos from February 2019 are drifting in

Those hardy souls that made the trek around February 19 through 22, 2019 braved some serious weather. Two lane roads, as well as Interstate highways, shut down due to record breaking snow fall. Not one person recommended taking skis…..LOL!

If you have your own photo(s) to share, please follow over to the article for more info. We would love to add them to those we are receiving. Some will make it on the website!

Click this link to see the article on Winter Conditions

Hilltop Parking Trail Head – February 2019 Image Courtesy of: WISPP

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COLD WEATHER BACKPACKING PRECAUTIONS

This post focuses on Cold Weather Backpacking. This website may be geared more for a specific location. Sure, the Havasupai area is a specialized backpacking trip. But the general thoughts on this subject spans just about any backpacking trip where you might encounter temperatures below 30°F.

Feb 2019 saw weather that broke snowfall records around the area. Night time low temperatures dipped into the low teens (Fahrenheit). IR#18 [road between Old RT 66 and the Hilltop Trail Head parking area] was closed for several periods of time due to snow.

Even Interstate 40 between Kingman, AZ and Flagstaff, AZ was shut down due to snow. Some people reported Kingman getting 12 inches of snow. All stuff unheard of for the area. At least for periods of many years in between.

The point is…..be prepared!

Click Link for the full article on Cold Weather Backpacking.

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MID FEBRUARY 2019 Cold Spell

Backpacking the Havasu Falls area this time of year, backpackers often experience cold weather. Especially the night time temperatures.

Click here for more on COLD WEATHER BACKPACKING info.

The past few days, and it appears for the coming week or so. The Havasu Falls area may experience night time temperatures dropping into the low teens (Fahrenheit). This is unusually cold. Day time highs will struggle to make it higher than the upper thirties. (Fahrenheit).

People in Las Vegas and closer area’s are reporting lower than normal temperatures. Las Vegas is looking at temperatures in the mid twenties (Fahrenheit) at night.

While these temperatures are “business as usual” for many winter backpackers. Such conditions for someone ill prepared or inexperienced, can really present some danger.

Such conditions require quality gear, high calorie foods & snacks, and the ability to stay dry and keep warm. This includes keeping your feet, hands, face, and head warm. Day and night!

It is advised you don’t start this trek taking a light-hearted approach. Not in these conditions. If you think your gear may be inadequate. It probably will be. Make sure you know what you are getting into. Make sure you know what you are doing. What might be a minor discomfort during normal weather, may have serious consequences if you are not prepared.

Know the signs of hypothermia. Don’t be afraid to admit to yourself or to those in your group you have a problem. If someone in your group is having symptoms. You need to help them. Get them warmed up. Even drinking warmed water will help. Check on people that complain they are cold.

If for some reason you fall in the water with your clothes on, during really cold temperatures. You need to get the wet clothes off. Get dry, and warm up as soon as possible.

In a group atmosphere encourage others to be open about voicing concerns they may be getting into trouble. Then act in such a fashion everyone is OK. Remember your gear might be better than the gear your co-backpackers have. That includes clothing and footwear. Don’t judge someone else on how comfortable you may feel.

If you feel you are in a situation that could go from bad to worse. Start hiking to your vehicle. Walk at a good pace to warm up and keep warm. Walk steady and don’t stop until you have made it safely to your vehicle. You can always return and do this trip another time.

Signs and Symptoms of Hypothermia

Stage 1
Mild
Awake and Shivering
Possible increased urine production and mental confusion

Stage 2
Moderate
Drowsy and not Shivering
Mental confusion, Slurred speech, loss of fine motor skills
Paradoxical undressing

Stage 3
Severe
Not shivering
Mental confusion, decreased or increased heart rate, decrease in breathing rate
Paradoxical undressing
Unconscious

Stage 4
Profound
No Vital Signs

NOTE: Paradoxical undressing: As a person becomes disoriented, confused, and combative. They may begin discarding their clothing. Further increasing body heat loss.

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ZION NATIONAL PARK closes the NARROWS access 9/25/2018 Re Opened 9/28/2018

[9/28/2018] The below info has a status change.  As of Friday September 28, 2018 the Narrows, Top Down permits are again being issued.  An agreement was reached with a landowner, to resolve the conflict.

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[9/25/2018]  Reports started flowing in 9/25/2018 that Zion National Park has suspended issuing permits to the “Narrows” area, including the popular “Top-Down” trips.

Zion Narrows

This is due to a dispute over Private Property rights.

Day hiking from the Temple of Sinawava to Big Spring is open.  Upstream travel beyond Big Spring is prohibited.

We haven’t heard what has triggered this.  It is a reminder to respect the land, and the locals at all times, no matter where you travel.  You never know what might make someone decide to no longer share.

Here is a Link to the official Zion NP website.
https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/thenarrows.htm

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HIDDEN FALLS

One of our contributors has provided a great write-up on Hidden Falls.   Again we wish to thank Jessica Rose for her time.  But alas we have been informed this area is Off Limits to visitors/tourists.

Those recommending a visit to this area are misinformed.  We where given  information that this particular Falls, and general side trail area is not marked on purpose .   Visitors and tourists are not suppose to be in this area.

Brain Volk writes:

There is a reason that there aren’t signs marking this falls, and above it, on the trail, there are signs saying not to go there. The cliff and ground around it is unstable.

The Ramada (wooden structure) is rebuilt and used for ceremonies. Its not an area where tourists are supposed to go. We are not welcome to go off the main trail here.

Follow Link to Hidden Falls for Details and Photo!

Subscribe to our email list to get personal notifications of these types of informational Blog Post.
Subscribe to our email list Here!

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First Trip Report after devastating July 2018 Flash Flood

Note From Editor/Admin.  The following trip report is a contribution from one of our readers and associated Facebook group membership.

As you may, or may not be aware of, the Havasu Falls/Supai, Arizona area was devastated by a Flash Flood on July 13, 2018.  In some estimates there was in excess of $250,000.00 worth of damage to the village, the campgrounds and the trail.

The area was closed off to tourists, campers, and visitors while safety concerns were eliminated, and repairs were made.

Click this Link to follow over to the Full Trip Report with photos

The long anticipated reopening of the area was on September 1, 2018.   We expected physical alterations to the natural beauty of the area.  It has occurred in the past.  This is an ever changing environment.  We have been hoping someone would let us know what to expect.

Lower Navajo Falls – September 2018

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Supai – Havasu Falls area reopens 9/1 /2018

We just received wonderful news.  An Official Havasupai PR Media release.  It reads as follows:

The Havasupai Tribal Council confirms that the trail and campgrounds will re-open as planned on September 1, 2018. The necessary repairs to the trail and campgrounds have been completed and the areas are safe for visitors.

Visitors are advised to be prepared for the monsoon season, which typically runs through September 30, 2018.

All visitors need to be alert at all times throughout their visit and to carry plenty of water as temperatures in the summer soar to well over 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius).  All visitors must comply with posted signs and instructions from Tribal officials.

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Riding horses rather than hiking

In 2016 when we started creating our website, riding horses was very limited.  The Official Havasupai Tribe website was not even showing pricing at one time.

Recently it was brought to our attention, this service is once again available.  Info showing up on the Tribes Official Website.

We do caution, you may find old pricing posted at various sources on the internet.  Especially on some tour groups that offer guide services.

We suggest you go to the only official source.  That being the tribal website.

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July 26, 2018 Update on the Supai area Flash Flood

This is an official update/media release statement provided to us.
This came out 7/26/2018.
See below

Tribal Council Passes Declaration of Disaster Resolution

The Havasupai Tribal Council passed a Declaration of Disaster (Resolution #39-18) declaring a state of emergency for the Havasupai Indian Reservation trails leading into Supai, Village in Northern Arizona.  On July 11, 2018 several waves of flooding hit Supai village and Havasu Campgrounds. The storm caused catastrophic damage in the form of mud and rock slides to the Hualapai Hilltop trail, including the dislocation of large boulders which are blocking the only access for food, medical and mail supplies in and out of Supai Village.  The United States Postal Service has temporarily ceased mail delivery by mule train to Supai (this is the last location in the US to be served in this manner).  In addition, critical food and supplies are cut off to the Village except through helicopter.

The declaration states, due to flood levels and rock slides the main trail leading into Supai, Village has been declared dangerous and needs major repairs.  Currently, Hilltop Trailhead is closed to all hikers and mule trains into the Village out of concern for the life, health, safety and well-being of the residents and animals in Supai.

“The unstable and dangerous conditions of the affected areas and our Tribe’s limited resources necessitate the need for federal assistance,” said Chairwoman Muriel Coochwytewa.  “The Tribal Council, in consultation with The Arizona Department of Public Safety, the Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (AZ DEMA) and Coconino County Emergency Management, have determined that the cost of emergency repairs is expected to exceed $250,000. With our limited resources, we are unable to undertake this effort without federal assistance.”

An initial assessment by State and County Emergency Officials the disaster requires major remediation and recovery efforts.  The Tribe is taking steps to qualify for disaster assistance from the United States.

According to Chairwoman Coochwytewa, the Tribe’s primary source of revenue is the tourists who travel from all over the world to experience the Reservation’s unique blue-green waterfalls.  The closure of Tribe’s tourist economy will be devastating to the economic status and directly affect tribal members employed by the Tourism Department as well.

“The immediate and extended closure of Havasu Canyon will cause severe financial harm to the Havasupai Reservation and our Tribal members,” said Chairwoman Coochwytewa.  “The trail from Hualapai Hilltop is unsafe and due to these conditions, will remain closed allowing the Tribe to ensure that the area is safe.  The campgrounds and the lodge will re-open on September 1, 2018.”

Visitors with confirmed reservations at the campground or the lodge that are impacted by this closure are encouraged to contact the Tourist Office to reschedule, 928-448-2141. Please be patient as the Tourist Office works to accommodate all requests. 

The flooding necessitated the activation of the Havasupai Tribal Emergency Response Team who initiated the relocation, housing, clothing, feeding and evacuation of all visitors.  This was done at the Tribe’s own expense, totaling an estimated $25,000.

The Havasupai people reside primarily in Supai Village, remotely located in the bottom of a canyon in Northern Arizona adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park.  At the time of the flood, it is estimated that 400 tribal members as well an additional 10-15 people who are contracted tribal or federal employees were in the area.

“The Tribe would like to thank all the agencies and individual tribal members that responded during the Emergency including the Havasupai Tourist Office staff, BIA-Law Enforcement, Supai Café/Store/Lodge staff, IHS-Indian Health Service, BIE-Bureau of Education, Papillion Helicopters, Airwest Helicopters, and DPS-Department of Public Safety, and the Hualapai Tribe,” said Chairwoman Coochwytewa.

The Tribe is currently accepting monetary donations.  Donations can be made to the Havasupai 2018 Flood Relief Fund at www.HavasupaiReservations.com/donate.

Donations of supplies are also accepted and may be delivered to Hualapai Hilltop or the Tribe’s office in Flagstaff at 5200 E. Cortland Blvd, Ste. D-5, Flagstaff, AZ 86004.

A list of needed supplies: https://bit.ly/2JKaRZZ.  Additional information will be updated on the Tribe’s website at http://theofficialhavasupaitribe.com/.

 

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