HAVASUPAI Reservations 2022 (Havasupai Official Info)

HAVASUPAI

Visiting Havasupai Falls Update

Dear xxx

We are reaching out to you because you have previously visited Havasupai Falls, expressed a desire to visit Havasupai Falls, or you possibly know someone with a current Havasupai Falls Reservation.

Know that Havasupai tourism is temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic. While plans to reopen are being discussed, no dates have been set yet.

The Havasupai Reservation and Supai Village remain on lockdown and are closed to all tourists. Please do not travel to the Havasupai Reservation or Supai Village. All tourists are prohibited from entering at this time. Please check for updates at HavasupaiReservations.com and HavasupaiLodge.com.


What are your Reservation date preferences?

You can now enter Reservation Preferences. Entering your preferences can give you the best chance of obtaining the exact reservation you want, so you can make the most of your trip to Havasupai Falls.

This information is also needed for next season’s visitor tourism planning purposes. You can enter as many preferred dates as you would like.

Your Campground Reservation Preference >>

Your Lodge Reservation Preference >>

Reminder: Reservations remain non-refundable and non-changeable, and travel insurance is always recommended, especially for visiting Havasupai Falls.

Any reservations affected by the temporary suspension of tourism now or in the future will be rescheduled to a later date at no cost.


You can book a Reservation via the Transfer System right now

All Reservations had to be rescheduled to the 2022 season. New Reservations will not be available for purchase until 2023 or later. The Transfer System is the only way to obtain a Reservation.

You can obtain an existing Reservation right now, which can be used after tourism reopens.

The Transfer System is the only way for current reservation holders to have funds returned to them.

Existing Reservations are available for purchase on the public Cancellations / Transfers list and all Reservations purchased now are active and valid for use once tourism reopens.

Check the Campground reservations Cancellations / Transfer list here >>

Check the Lodge reservations Cancellations / Transfer list here >>

You can also purchase a Reservation if you are listed as a PATL (Potential Alternate Trip Leader) on a Reservation.

Pack Mule reservations can be booked after a Campground or Lodge reservation has been booked.

Associated Pack Mule reservations, if affected by the tourism closure, will be automatically rescheduled along with the affected Campground or Lodge reservation.


Check the Reservations websites frequently for updates

Updates will be posted in your account dashboard as soon as they become available.

HavasupaiReservations.com

HavasupaiLodge.com


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HIDDEN FALLS

One of our contributors has provided a great write-up on Hidden Falls.   Again we wish to thank Jessica Rose for her time.  But alas we have been informed this area is Off Limits to visitors/tourists.

Those recommending a visit to this area are misinformed.  We where given  information that this particular Falls, and general side trail area is not marked on purpose .   Visitors and tourists are not suppose to be in this area.

Brain Volk writes:

There is a reason that there aren’t signs marking this falls, and above it, on the trail, there are signs saying not to go there. The cliff and ground around it is unstable.

The Ramada (wooden structure) is rebuilt and used for ceremonies. Its not an area where tourists are supposed to go. We are not welcome to go off the main trail here.

Follow Link to Hidden Falls for Details and Photo!

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First Trip Report after devastating July 2018 Flash Flood

Note From Editor/Admin.  The following trip report is a contribution from one of our readers and associated Facebook group membership.

As you may, or may not be aware of, the Havasu Falls/Supai, Arizona area was devastated by a Flash Flood on July 13, 2018.  In some estimates there was in excess of $250,000.00 worth of damage to the village, the campgrounds and the trail.

The area was closed off to tourists, campers, and visitors while safety concerns were eliminated, and repairs were made.

Click this Link to follow over to the Full Trip Report with photos

The long anticipated reopening of the area was on September 1, 2018.   We expected physical alterations to the natural beauty of the area.  It has occurred in the past.  This is an ever changing environment.  We have been hoping someone would let us know what to expect.

Lower Navajo Falls – September 2018

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Supai – Havasu Falls area reopens 9/1 /2018

We just received wonderful news.  An Official Havasupai PR Media release.  It reads as follows:

The Havasupai Tribal Council confirms that the trail and campgrounds will re-open as planned on September 1, 2018. The necessary repairs to the trail and campgrounds have been completed and the areas are safe for visitors.

Visitors are advised to be prepared for the monsoon season, which typically runs through September 30, 2018.

All visitors need to be alert at all times throughout their visit and to carry plenty of water as temperatures in the summer soar to well over 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius).  All visitors must comply with posted signs and instructions from Tribal officials.

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July 26, 2018 Update on the Supai area Flash Flood

This is an official update/media release statement provided to us.
This came out 7/26/2018.
See below

Tribal Council Passes Declaration of Disaster Resolution

The Havasupai Tribal Council passed a Declaration of Disaster (Resolution #39-18) declaring a state of emergency for the Havasupai Indian Reservation trails leading into Supai, Village in Northern Arizona.  On July 11, 2018 several waves of flooding hit Supai village and Havasu Campgrounds. The storm caused catastrophic damage in the form of mud and rock slides to the Hualapai Hilltop trail, including the dislocation of large boulders which are blocking the only access for food, medical and mail supplies in and out of Supai Village.  The United States Postal Service has temporarily ceased mail delivery by mule train to Supai (this is the last location in the US to be served in this manner).  In addition, critical food and supplies are cut off to the Village except through helicopter.

The declaration states, due to flood levels and rock slides the main trail leading into Supai, Village has been declared dangerous and needs major repairs.  Currently, Hilltop Trailhead is closed to all hikers and mule trains into the Village out of concern for the life, health, safety and well-being of the residents and animals in Supai.

“The unstable and dangerous conditions of the affected areas and our Tribe’s limited resources necessitate the need for federal assistance,” said Chairwoman Muriel Coochwytewa.  “The Tribal Council, in consultation with The Arizona Department of Public Safety, the Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (AZ DEMA) and Coconino County Emergency Management, have determined that the cost of emergency repairs is expected to exceed $250,000. With our limited resources, we are unable to undertake this effort without federal assistance.”

An initial assessment by State and County Emergency Officials the disaster requires major remediation and recovery efforts.  The Tribe is taking steps to qualify for disaster assistance from the United States.

According to Chairwoman Coochwytewa, the Tribe’s primary source of revenue is the tourists who travel from all over the world to experience the Reservation’s unique blue-green waterfalls.  The closure of Tribe’s tourist economy will be devastating to the economic status and directly affect tribal members employed by the Tourism Department as well.

“The immediate and extended closure of Havasu Canyon will cause severe financial harm to the Havasupai Reservation and our Tribal members,” said Chairwoman Coochwytewa.  “The trail from Hualapai Hilltop is unsafe and due to these conditions, will remain closed allowing the Tribe to ensure that the area is safe.  The campgrounds and the lodge will re-open on September 1, 2018.”

Visitors with confirmed reservations at the campground or the lodge that are impacted by this closure are encouraged to contact the Tourist Office to reschedule, 928-448-2141. Please be patient as the Tourist Office works to accommodate all requests. 

The flooding necessitated the activation of the Havasupai Tribal Emergency Response Team who initiated the relocation, housing, clothing, feeding and evacuation of all visitors.  This was done at the Tribe’s own expense, totaling an estimated $25,000.

The Havasupai people reside primarily in Supai Village, remotely located in the bottom of a canyon in Northern Arizona adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park.  At the time of the flood, it is estimated that 400 tribal members as well an additional 10-15 people who are contracted tribal or federal employees were in the area.

“The Tribe would like to thank all the agencies and individual tribal members that responded during the Emergency including the Havasupai Tourist Office staff, BIA-Law Enforcement, Supai Café/Store/Lodge staff, IHS-Indian Health Service, BIE-Bureau of Education, Papillion Helicopters, Airwest Helicopters, and DPS-Department of Public Safety, and the Hualapai Tribe,” said Chairwoman Coochwytewa.

The Tribe is currently accepting monetary donations.  Donations can be made to the Havasupai 2018 Flood Relief Fund at www.HavasupaiReservations.com/donate.

Donations of supplies are also accepted and may be delivered to Hualapai Hilltop or the Tribe’s office in Flagstaff at 5200 E. Cortland Blvd, Ste. D-5, Flagstaff, AZ 86004.

A list of needed supplies: https://bit.ly/2JKaRZZ.  Additional information will be updated on the Tribe’s website at http://theofficialhavasupaitribe.com/.

 

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UPDATE Havasu Falls Flash Flood 201807131606


7/19/2018
We have not had an official Havasupai Media Release since the one shown below of July 13, 2018 4:06.  We have noticed they have updated their official website to indicate the area is closed to visitors/tourist until at least the end of July 2018.
Click the link for the Official Havasupai Website

************************************************************************

7/13/2018
UPDATE Havasu Falls Flash Flood July 13, 2018 4:06 local
Release:201807131606

Havasupai Media Release:

Havasupai Tribe’s Quick Response Ensures All Visitors Safely Evacuated Following Flash Flood.

The nearly 200 visitors onsite at the campgrounds at Havasupai Falls were safely evacuated from the area by 6 pm Thursday, July 12, 2018.  Thanks to the quick response from the Havasupai Tribal Council and the Havasupai Tourism Enterprise employees, there were no serious injuries or casualties reported.

Many had to evacuate without their packs. Grand Canyon Caverns provided food for those who were evacuated, along with showers and usage of the Cavern’s telephones.

There were two waves of flooding.  About 7 feet of flood waters hit Supai shortly before dark on July 11, 2018.  Brian Klimowski of the National Weather Service in Flagstaff contacted the tribe around 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 with a flood advisory for the area.

The Tribal Council immediately activated the Tourist Office and Emergency Response Team, who promptly evacuated the campgrounds.  There were 17 visitors on the opposite side of the flooded creek that were unable to leave the area immediately.   They were able to safely evacuate the area at sunrise on July 12, after the water had receded.

The second wave of flooding occurred at approximately 3:30 am on July 12.

The Tribal Council opened up the Community Building and the elementary school for all visitors to sleep.  In addition, the Tribe opened up the store and distributed food and supplies to the tourists.

The waves of flood waters did not hit Supai Village (approximately 1 ½ miles from the campground), but there is some significant flooding in several Tribal buildings due to the rain water.  In addition, there are reports of debris, sinkholes and a bridge that has been compromised. This is throughout the Tribal Community (non-public areas).

The Arizona Department of Public Safety dispatched a field officer to Supai to assist Tribal leadership in assessing and evaluating the conditions.  The Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (AZ DEMA) and Coconino County Emergency Management will also be assisting the Tribe in assessing and evaluating the conditions of the area.

Following these evaluations, the Tribal Council will determine if it qualifies for federal disaster relief designation and will consider at that time whether to apply for assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

There are approximately 400 tribal members that live in Supai as well an additional 10-15 people who are contracted tribal or federal employees.  Helicopter service is running as scheduled and anyone currently in Supai is able to leave via helicopter if they so choose.

Indian Route 18 remains closed to the public until further notice. Tribal members, law enforcement and emergency response teams will be able to travel via Indian Route 18.

The trail from Hilltop is unsafe and due to the conditions in Supai, the area remains closed to visitors  until the Tribe repairs the damaged campgrounds and determines that the area is safe.  Tourists with confirmed reservations should contact their travel agent or outfitter for more information.  If your visit is directly impacted by this closure, you will have the option to reschedule your reservation, although specifics on the process are unavailable at this time.

The tourism office estimates that there are approximately 300 reservations that may be impacted by the closure.

Please DO NOT contact the Tribal Tourism Office at this time.  All phone lines are being used for emergency services.  Updated information regarding re-opening will posted on the Tribe’s website http://theofficialhavasupaitribe.com/.

Video at this link is courtesy of Tara Brewer

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Touring Grand Canyon Caverns

Wow touring the Cavern [Near Peach Springs, Arizona on Old RT 66] was a great side trip.  I am sorry we never did it sooner!

If you are intending to camp, or even considering camping, at the Grand Canyon Caverns Campgrounds, or simply passing by on old RT 66.  Be sure to allow time for the Cavern Tour!

Did you know you can have your meal down in the Cavern?  The combo meal & tour is very reasonably priced.  When we looked at the menu and the tour, as individual prices.  Having the experience in the cave, was a no brain’er!

Follow the link over to the full article.  In the article there are links to other points of interest.  Also our experience camping in the campground.  Grand Canyon Caverns Article.

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CAMPING AT THE TRAIL HEAD PARKING AREA Can I do it?

Technically no.  But to date, and to our knowledge, there are no official rules prohibiting it.

There are no camping facilities.  No water source.  No electric.  No artificial lights.  For the most part no room to place things like tents, cots, chairs, or sleeping bags, unless you don’t care about pissing people off.

It can be noisy.

No shade.

Hotter than blazes during the summer months. Many complain it is noisy throughout the night. Cold nights during the cooler months.

There is only a pit toilet near the trailhead.

The parking area fills and people start parking along both sides of the narrow road.

Some self centered people think it is OK to park, then set up chairs or sleeping bags in the parking space next to them. They are actually posting it on social media as the way to start the trip. Come on people…that is not OK to be fair to others. This is the kind of behavior that ends up creating conflicts, rules, and restrictions.

There are often not enough parking places to go around just for vehicles.  Starting in 2018 it appears they are upping the headcount allowed to visit on a given day.  So parking will become even a bigger hassle.

The reservations in recent years have been completely sold out. The parking lot overflows as it is. If you are inconsiderate enough to take extra parking spots to set up sleeping space or gear, and say “to H&LL” with others.  Be prepared to deal with belligerent people trying to find a parking space. This is a good way to put yourself in a bad situation with escalating conflicts.

Some people are silent complainers.   You might win a face to face confrontation.  But this is the kind of stuff that gets your vehicle messed up once you hike away from it.

That doesn’t even count the chance of getting run over/backed over accidentally in the dark if camping on the pavement. We are all here to enjoy this area. Be courteous and think of others. Don’t cause a situation. None of us are here for a negative experience. Plan better and please do not subscribe to, or promote this type of thinking.

Sleeping in a Van and Truck is certainly more doable.   Depending on the season of course.   Even then this area is my last choice for sleeping accommodations.   I have slept in my van once in the parking area.  There are way better options for a more enjoyable adventure.

In some cases you might be able to park along and off the side of the road and stretch out between your vehicle and the guard rail….or your vehicle and the canyon wall on the other side. Or the other side of the guard rail.  But there are hazards we will mention below, in that scenario too.

Once you get there, and see the situation, most have the same recommendation we have.  Check Google Earth to appreciate the recommendation not to sleep here, given just the terrain.

On the rising canyon side, there is a concern about falling rocks.  Bad enough a rock may land on your vehicle.  Worse if you are out in the open and one lands on you.

On the dropping canyon side…falling kids, if you have them along.

On the dropping canyon side there is often not even enough room to park a vehicle off the pavement.

Below is a photo off Google earth to indicate what I am referring to.

Click LINK to Activate Google Maps for the Hilltop Trail Head Parking Area

Sleeping in this area is a tough way to start out this trip, if you are tired.

During, Spring, Fall, Winter, at least the heat won’t be much of a factor.  More likely the cold will creep in on you.  Ideally, if this is your option for an early start, you have a van or can sleep in the back of a PU Truck.

There are Hotels and Camping about an hour, to an hour and a half, before the intersection of RT#66 and IR#18.  Check Peach Springs Arizona, Seligman Arizona, and  Grand Canyon Caverns Campgrounds that also has lodging.

Many people opt for these…and they fill up too.  So reserve early.  Then get up and on the road right as it begins to get light. (Before actual sunrise)  Make this last hour or so of the drive and arrive just before or around full light.

The switchbacks will remain in shadow and be the coolest of the day for about 2 hours.  You should have no problem making it down the switchbacks before the sun gets high enough to shine on you.

Don’t travel that last 60 mile stretch of road in the dark.  It is “open range”.  Lots of dark cattle, elk, deer, etc.  The road is desolate and no lights.  Failing to heed this warning might very well result in a very damaged vehicle or something worse.  Don’t be in that big of a hurry,

Though I have never personally had issues with vehicle break-ins, from time to time there are reports this occurs.  Be it a local or some tourist, I have never heard.  But this is like any other parking lot situation.  Do not leave valuables in your car.  Things you do leave behind stash out of sight, preferably locked in the trunk.

FOOD & CRITTER PROTECTION – RATSACK

A sure sign of a rookie backpacker/tent camper is leaving food or smelly things like soap products, toothpaste , etc in their tent.  Critters of all sort will destroy your gear trying to get to it.  The Havasu Falls area campground is well known for this problem.

If you made this error in bear country you most likely would have a lasting memory.

This includes packs and sleeping bags.  Anything left on the ground or simply hung on a tree.  Anything with a “Smell” no matter how well sealed or even unopened.  It all needs to be removed from your gear when unattended or when your are sleeping.  Then other prevent measures taken.

Though this is not bear country there are numerous critters that have had generations worth of training in this area due to visitors not practicing food storage protection.

A Ratsack or other food protection method is necessary when backpacking the Havasu Falls area.  There are a variety of critters lurking, waiting to snack on what you transport in.We have made the trip to Havasu Falls numerous years. We have hit all seasons. From blistering summer heat, to bone chilling times of the year with snow. We have found all seasons have critters looking for easy food pickings. Namely your backpacked food.

While the squirrels are the most prevalent and most destructive.  There are also ring tailed cats (similar to a raccoon), mice, rats, roaming horses, and the local dogs. While all times of the year have their hazards, the warmer months see the highest activity.

You want to protect your tent, packs, and sleeping bags from damage. While in your campsite, keep all food and smelly items such as toothpaste, soap, cosmetics, lip balms, etc out of your tent, sleeping bags, and packs that are left unattended. Forget for even 5 minutes and it may be too late.

They will chew through tents (the rodents), drag your pack away (ring tails and dogs), and trample your tent (horses).  The horses can also stand on their hind legs to rip packs down that are hung on tree’s.

The first line of defense is to get your food and toiletries away from your expensive gear. Many use tupperware containers and things like that.

Our most successful method of prevention so far, is to purchase a Ratsack, to stash our stuff. Then use a length of 100lb test mono-filament fishing line over a high tree branch. Hoist up the sack high enough. Keep in mind horses will stand on their hind legs to reach up and try to snatch goodies.

All of our items are first put in ziplock freezer bags. Even our “Pack it out Trash” is ziplock bagged and kept in your Ratsack too.

We ordered our “Ratsack”off Amazon. Only the large size was available at the time. When it arrived it looked overly large. It probably is too large for a single person. In hindsight I am glad that was the one we purchased. For two people it is very ample. We hadn’t thought through the trash issue until we were actually on the first trip with it. Then we were glad for the larger ratsack. We had plenty of room for both food and trash, times 2 people, for a 3 night backpacking trip.

Other successful suggestions: At times there are 5 gal plastic buckets with lids available from the ranger building at the entrance to the campgrounds. These are effective. People that have used them suggest sliding them under the picnic table seat anytime you are not into your food.

The only problem is you can’t depend on buckets/pails being available. Especially when there during busy times.   If you want to guarantee you have some type of protection, bring it with you.

Bear proof containers are another option if you have one and don’t mind the additional weight. I would opt for the Ratsack in lieu of the Bear proof container. I have both to pick from.  Its all about weight!

Keeping with Leave No Trace. Whatever you bring to hang your food. Containers, string, rope, or what have you. Be sure to take it down and pack it out when you hike out. Don’t leave any of it behind for the “next person”.

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HACKBERRY GENERAL STORE ON OLD ROUTE 66 – Willem Bor

Today I stumbled into information related to the Hackberry General Store along Old Route 66, and an artist named Willem Bor. The route is often referred to as the “Mother Road”.   The artist, fascinated by the route and old structures, set off to recreate them in model form.

If you are making a road trip from the west to Backpack Havasu Falls you will mostly likely pass right by the Hackberry General Store.   Be sure to factor in some time to make a stop.

The artist info linked further in this article becomes so much more if you stop, get out, and explore the Hackberry General Store area.


Have you ever gotten to a page on the internet you have no idea how it happened? Suddenly into some obscure website that piques your interest? Subject related to something you would have never thought to go searching for it? Ah, the pleasures of modern technology. It allows you to travel the world in micro-seconds.

I have driven old sections of Route 66 over the years. I know I have been on numerous parts of it across the U.S.  Chopped up pieces.  Parts now off the beaten path of the much faster Interstate Highways.  Though at this stage most of my recollection is isolated to some Arizona sections.  Many small towns are locked in time.  Seeming to stand unchanged since the time the Interstates bypassed once vibrant travel stops.

On the the subject I really wish to share. I stumbled into a blog of an artist (Willem Bor).  His blog was created to show his craft of model making. Oddly he did not live in USA. But fell in love with the buildings along Old Route 66 during a visit. Many which are disappearing with time and decay.  Willem Bor set off to recreate them in miniature form.  In detail you may find hard to believe.

One building in particular is currently still standing and called “Hackberry’s General Store”. I have actually been there on numerous occasions, and have done my own photography.

Check out his blog link below. You can find the Hackberry General Store built in model size.  Compare it to our photos on this page.  Visit it in person should you have the opportunity.  Then you judge how cool these model buildings are. I also love the history that is provided with each piece.

Sadly, in researching and going to his Facebook page I believe he is no longer with us since January 2017? His work and website lives on, at least for now. We can only hope he is traveling along Route 66 and comparing his work.

Link to:  Route 66 Model Art – by Willem Bor

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